Effect of intensive versus standard blood pressure control on depression and health-related quality of life in type 2 diabetes: the ACCORD trial uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that intensive (systolic blood pressure [SBP] <120 mmHg) rather than standard (SBP 130-139 mmHg) blood pressure (BP) control improves health-related quality of life (HRQL) in those with type 2 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Subjects were 1,028 ACCORD (Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes) BP trial HRQL substudy participants who completed baseline and one or more 12-, 36-, or 48-month HRQL evaluations. Multivariable linear regression assessed impact of BP treatment assignment on change in HRQL. RESULTS: Over 4.0 years of follow-up, no significant differences occurred in five of six HRQL measures. Those assigned to intensive (vs. standard) BP control had statistically significant worsening of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-item short-form health survey (SF36) physical component scores (-0.8 vs. -0.2; P = 0.02), but magnitude of change was not clinically significant. Findings persisted across all prespecified subgroups. CONCLUSIONS: Intensive BP control in the ACCORD trial did not have a clinically significant impact, either positive or negative, on depression or patient-reported HRQL.

publication date

  • 2012