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Karen Margolis, MD, MPH

Karen Margolis

Expertise:

Epidemiology and community health, women's health

Job title:

Director of clinical research, HealthPartners Research Foundation

Bio:

Karen Margolis, MD, MPH, is director of clinical research with the HealthPartners Research Foundation. In addition to her own research, she has been part of several large, multi-center, federally funded trials, including the Women's Health Initiative and Aspirin in Reducing Events in the Elderly (ASPREE) study. Her interests include postmenopausal women's health, prevention of heart disease, hypertension and diabetes.

Dr. Margolis has published numerous papers in medical journals such as the Journal of the American Medical Association, the New England Journal of Medicine and the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Sources of funding:

National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services, National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, RAND Corporation, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Inc.

In the news:

Study: Smoking increases post-menopause breast cancer risk - Minnesota Public Radio - March 2, 2011

Smoking may increase breast cancer risk - WebMD Health News - March 1, 2011

Quotes:

“Quitting smoking is one more thing women can do to reduce their risk for breast cancer. There are a lot of things out of our control, but lifestyle factors such as breastfeeding, having children young, staying physically active and limiting alcohol consumption can lower your risk. Not smoking or quitting smoking is something women can take control of.”

“Some people may want to quit smoking because of ill effects on their family members. Some people may be more worried about heart disease. Some people may be more worried about lung cancer. And for some people, hearing about the increased risk of breast cancer may just be the straw that breaks the camel's back and gets them to quit.”

“While hormone replacement therapy can be very effective for treating menopausal symptoms, it is not a suitable long-term treatment to prevent the diseases of aging.”

Did you know?

Karen Margolis also serves on the faculty at the University of Minnesota in the Department of Medicine and School of Public Health.