Better glycemic control and weight loss with the novel long-acting basal insulin LY2605541 compared with insulin glargine in type 1 diabetes: a randomized, crossover study uri icon

abstract

  • OBJECTIVE To compare effects of LY2605541 versus insulin glargine on daily mean blood glucose as part of a basal-bolus regimen for type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS In this randomized, Phase 2, open-label, 2 x 2 crossover study, 137 patients received once-daily basal insulin (LY2605541 or glargine) plus mealtime insulin for 8 weeks, followed by crossover treatment for 8 weeks. Daily mean blood glucose was obtained from 8-point self-monitored blood glucose profiles. The noninferiority margin was 10.8 mg/dL. RESULTS LY2605541 met noninferiority and superiority criteria compared with insulin glargine in daily mean blood glucose (144.2 vs. 151.7 mg/dL, least squares mean difference = -9.9 mg/dL [90% CI -14.6 to -5.2], P < 0.001). Fasting blood glucose variability and A1C were reduced with LY2605541 compared with insulin glargine (both P < 0.001). Mealtime insulin dose decreased with LY2605541 and increased with insulin glargine. Mean weight decreased 1.2 kg with LY2605541 and increased 0.7 kg with insulin glargine (P < 0.001). The total hypoglycemia rate was higher for LY2605541 (P = 0.04) and the nocturnal hypoglycemia rate was lower (P = 0.01), compared with insulin glargine. Adverse events (including severe hypoglycemia) were similar, although more gastrointestinal-related events occurred with LY2605541 (15% vs. 4%, P < 0.001). Mean changes (all within normal range) were higher for alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, triglycerides, and LDL-cholesterol and lower for HDL-cholesterol with LY2605541 compared with insulin glargine (all P < 0.02). CONCLUSIONS In type 1 diabetes, compared with insulin glargine, LY2605541, a novel, long-acting basal insulin, demonstrated greater improvements in glycemic control, increased total hypoglycemia, and reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia, as well as reduced weight and lowered mealtime insulin doses.

publication date

  • 2013