The new HMORN-OAICs AGING initiative [presentation] Presentation uri icon

abstract

  • Background/Aims: This presentation will describe the new HMORN-OAICs AGING Initiative (“Advancing Geriatrics Infrastructure & Network Growth”) was funded in September 2014 by the National Institute on Aging. This R24 grant represents an exciting opportunity to build upon the collective and complementary knowledge, resources, and capabilities of the HMORN and the OAICs (a.k.a., Pepper Centers) to develop an interdisciplinary research agenda focused on older adults with multiple chronic conditions (MCCs). The Pepper Centers include 14 university-based centers established by the National Institute on Aging to advance research into the causes, mechanisms, prevention, and treatment of functional decline and disability with aging. Methods: The approaches to be employed under the HMORN-OAICs AGING initiative include the following: (1) collaboratively develop a framework and procedures to enhance the existing HMORN data infrastructure to advance interdisciplinary research on older adults with multiple chronic conditions; (2) support interdisciplinary pilot projects that optimize HMORN and OAIC resources and foster collaboration between HMORN and OAIC investigators to address questions relevant to data validity, comparative effectiveness, health outcomes, health disparities, and costs of care in older persons with MCCs; (3) identify and mentor junior faculty from the HMORN and OAICs with a research focus on older adults with multiple chronic conditions; and (4) disseminate interdisciplinary research approaches and findings relating to the science of multiple chronic conditions in older adults to the larger scientific community. Results: These synergistic activities will leverage the accumulated aging research expertise of the OAICs together with the HMORN’s large patient populations, electronic health record data, and cadre of embedded healthcare delivery system researchers. Discussion: The HMORN-OAICs AGING Initiative will create a unique national resource that will: (1) encourage, facilitate, and support research that can address the most important questions relevant to older persons with multiple chronic conditions; (2) increase knowledge about how best to use data found in electronic health record systems from multiple, diverse healthcare organizations; (3) promote collaboration among researchers from different disciplines, and engage, mentor, and develop junior faculty from across these fields; and (4) disseminate findings from research on older persons with MCCs that will translate into the delivery of higher quality and more cost-effective care.