Improved self-efficacy and satisfaction with care among Hyperlink intervention patients [poster] Conference Poster uri icon

abstract

  • . Results:
  • Aims:
  • Background:
  • Conclusions:
  • Enrollees were 45% female, 82% white, and mean age was 61 years. Mean baseline BP was 148/85 mm Hg in both groups. BP results reported elsewhere. Mean overall rating of satisfaction with care at baseline was 4.3 among both groups and did not change. Several other satisfaction and self-efficacy measures showed positive, statistically significant changes only in TI patients during the first 6 months. Self-efficacy for measuring blood pressure in one's home was the only item showing positive change in TI patients at both 6 and 12 months.
  • Home telemonitoring with pharmacist case management as a combined intervention improved some aspects of patient satisfaction with care and self-efficacy.
  • Hyperlink is a clinic-randomized trial testing an intervention combining home BP telemonitoring with pharmacist case management in patients with uncontrolled hypertension.
  • Methods:
  • Practical, effective, and sustainable models are needed to improve BP management.
  • We enrolled 450 patients with uncontrolled BP from 16 primary care clinics, 8 randomized to usual care (UC, 222 patients) and 8 to telemonitoring intervention (TI, 228 patients). TI patients received home telemonitors and pharmacists met with them by phone, adjusting drug therapy based on home BP data. Patients were followed through 18 months to observe durability of effects on BP control. Satisfaction with care was measured using six questions rating patients' health care and providers on a 5 point scale (1 low, 5 high). Five self-efficacy questions rated patients' communication with providers and skills like taking medicine and monitoring their own BP

publication date

  • 2013