Influenza and pertussis vaccination coverage among privately insured women of reproductive age uri icon

abstract

  • An increasing number of vaccines are now designated as maternal vaccines, recommended prior to, during, or immediately following pregnancy. The influenza and pertussis (Tdap) vaccines have the potential to improve the health of women and their offspring. Among privately insured women of reproductive age, goals of this study were to describe influenza and Tdap vaccination coverage and to explore variation in coverage by age and race/ethnicity. This cross-sectional, observational study included women 18-44 years of age with continuous enrollment from 1 January 2007-31 March 2011 in a single, Midwestern health insurance plan and at least one visit to a plan affiliated practice. Data on vaccine coverage came from insurance claims, supplemented by electronic medical record data. Primary outcomes were: receipt of Tdap ever, receipt of Tdap or Tetanus vaccination (Td) in the past 10 years, and receipt of influenza vaccination during the 2010-2011 influenza season. Coverage was compared by race/ethnicity. Among 12,657 women with continuous private insurance, 45.5 % had received Tdap ever, 82.5 % had received Td or Tdap in the past 10 years, and 39.8 % received the influenza vaccine in the 2010-2011 season. Marked disparities in influenza vaccination coverage by race/ethnicity were observed, only 30.0 % of African American women received influenza vaccine compared to 40.7 % of white, non-Hispanic women (p < .0001). Among insured women of reproductive age, there is a need for interventions to increase Tdap and influenza vaccination uptake. Further research is needed to understand and address disparities in influenza vaccination coverage in this population.

publication date

  • 2013