Wyman-Chick, Kate A., PsyD
Publications included
 

Wyman-Chick, Kate A., PsyD uri icon
Clinical Neuropsychologist at HealthPartners Neuroscience Center

Positions

Title: Clinical Neuropsychologist at HealthPartners Neuroscience Center

Education: PsyD, clinical psychology, Pacific University; pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology/neuropsychology, University of Kansas School of Medicine – Wichita; fellowship in clinical neuropsychology, University of Virginia

 Research Highlights: Dr. Wyman’s research interests include early cognitive changes in Parkinson disease and other neurodegenerative disorders. She has published in journals, including Movement Disorders, Journal for the International Neuropsychological Society, Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry and Neurology, and Assessment. She has received special recognition for her research from the International Neuropsychological Society as well as the International Parkinsonism and Movement Disorder Society. In 2015, she was selected to attend a fully funded course for early-career Parkinson researchers, which was funded by the International Parkinsonism and Movement Disorder Society and the Parkinson Foundation. In 2017, she was selected to attend a fully funded junior-investigator training from the Parkinson Study Group, the largest group of Parkinson researchers in North America.

 Research interests/expertise:

  • Detection of cognitive impairment in prodromal/early-stage Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies
  • Cognitive outcomes of neurosurgery for Parkinson disease and essential tremor (eg, deep brain stimulation)
  • Neuroimaging correlates of neuropsychological performance in individuals with Parkinson disease and Alzheimer’s disease

Current Projects:

  • Neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric features of prodromal dementia with Lewy bodies
  • Cognition in individuals with parkinsonism and normal dopamine transporter (DAT) SPECT findings
  • Neuropsychological predictors of positive versus negative amyloid PET findings in individuals with a high clinical suspicion for Alzheimer’s disease
  • Improving diagnostic categorization of cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease
  • Challenges associated with longitudinal assessment of cognition in Parkinson disease

Publications